Tag Archives: IFM

What Functional Medicine is NOT, Part 2:

In the last post, I brought up a few myths that I frequently come across and dissected them.  As I mentioned before, when different practitioners use the same term (in this case Functional Medicine) to mean various things (such as nutrition, bioidentical hormones, or fad diets), this confuses people.  People are just starting to find out about Functional Medicine as it is, and many people aren’t exactly sure what it means.  And who can blame them?  It seems as though there is too wide a variety and not enough consistency, and people aren’t sure where to turn or who to trust.  I thought I’d help sort things out.

Since the last post got longer than I expected, I decided to split it into two parts.  Here is the second part…

Truth #5: Functional Medicine is not a scam, voodoo witch-doctor healing, or old wives’ tales.  The Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM) has published an authoritative textbook that covers nearly all aspects of true Functional Medicine.  The author page boasts an enormous amount of inter-disciplinary collaboration, meaning that Medical Doctors, PhDs, Doctors of Chiropractic, Doctors of Osteopathy, Naturopathic Doctors, Certified Clinical Nutritionists, Dentists, Massage Therapists, Physical Therapists, people with Masters degrees including Masters in Public Health, and Acupuncturists have all worked together to produce this resourceful body of knowledge.  The book cites numerous solid references to genuine studies published in standard, respected peer-reviewed journals across the world.

And that’s just the textbook that many of us use.  In addition, there are classes affiliated with educational institutions that are recognized and accredited by the US Department of Education.  There are cutting-edge authoritative books written for the public by esteemed authors such as Datis Kharrazian, whose protocols I follow (with a few modifications for individual needs and sensitivities), which by itself cites over 600 genuine references.

True Functional Medicine bases their holistic treatment approaches on diagnostic lab test results ordered through standard blood laboratories (the same ones that any hospital or conventional doctors would use), and other CLIA-certified specialty laboratories.  The reference ranges used to interpret lab work are narrower than these labs have set, but are nonetheless based on respected organizations such as the American Endocrine Society and the Vitamin D Council.

Truth #6: Functional Medicine has nothing to do with muscle testing or AK.  Some practitioners utilize “muscle testing”, also known as Applied Kinesiology (AK).  This involves having you hold your arm out, resisting the practitioner’s attempts to push/pull your arm in a certain direction (or directions).  Once he or she establishes that the muscle group s/he’ll use for testing is working properly, s/he’ll have you touch certain points on your body, make certain movements, hold certain positions, or hold certain objects.  These practitioners claim that the results of this “testing” can show if you have a liver problem or adrenal issue.

I have several significant problems with this.  First, the test itself may not be accurate or reliable.  Not only is it incredibly vulnerable to practitioner manipulation (whether he or she is aware of their influence or not), but the scientific research has not been done to back up the validity of this so-called testing.  Not only that, but even if its results are accurate (and let’s say the test really is valid for adrenal dysfunction), there are multiple kinds of dysfunction.  There is overactivity, underactivity, and normal activity but in a chaotic rhythm.  Muscle testing can’t reliably break things down that far, and it certainly can’t quantify it into objective numbers like real lab testing can.

Truth #7: Functional Medicine is a real, recognized form of medicine, not something the alternative medical community made up.  Functional Medicine is not a “chiropractic thing”; in fact, it’s not specific to any single healthcare discipline.  It’s definitely not a fly-by-night approach to be considered second to conventional medicine, with conventional medicine holding the ultimate authority, from whom everyone else (patients and other practitioners) must seek approval.  Functional Medicine, in most situations, can very well be regarded on an equal playing field as any medication-based approach, and Functional Medicine doctors are every bit as knowledgeable in their approach as (and sometimes even moreso than) conventional practitioners who have not studied this approach.

Functional Medicine is indeed a medical subspecialty; its non-pharmaceutical approach allows any non-drug practitioners, including Naturopathic Doctors (in states that license them–of which Texas, where I live, is not one), Doctors of Chiropractic, and others to practice.  Essentially, as long as the practitioner is licensed in the state in which they practice, and their license covers the ordering of diagnostic lab testing, then they may also legally interpret the results and offer a Functional Medicine approach.

I hope that clears up some of the confusion out there. 🙂


The Doctor behind the Blog…

Hi!  I thought I’d take a quick moment to introduce myself, because I think it helps to feel like you know the person behind the keystrokes.


I’m a chiropractic doctor who practices Functional Medicine exclusively.  I don’t do any spinal manipulation or physical rehab.  Instead, I spend all day ordering and interpreting diagnosting testing and forming strategic approaches we’ll use to address the problems I find.  Nothing that I do is taught very thoroughly in the typical chiropractic medical school; all of the education I utilize comes from post-doctoral programs and continuing education.

Along with my chiropractic doctor degree, I also graduated with two BS degrees – one in Anatomy and the other in Health and Wellness.  I’ve also completed nearly 85% of a post-doctoral Functional Neurology specialty/diplomate program, and have begun a Certified Clinical Nutritionist course and of course, many courses in Functional Medicine topics, such as blood chemistry interpretation, endocrinology and hormones from a functional perspective, neurotransmitters and cognitive function, and an extended intensive that exclusively dealt with thyroid disorders, including autoimmune thyroid conditions.

I’m currently serving as a member of the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and the prestigious Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM) and I’m about to become involved with the Texas Chiropractic Association (TCA) to help ensure that patients receive quality chiropractic care by positioning chiropractic as an evolved, scientific, logical, and dignified profession with integrity, skill, and compassion.


I’m a South Texas lady who advocates for what’s right and stands up for my patients.  I pour my heart and soul into my patient cases and seeking ever greater knowledge and understanding.  I consider my career one of my hobbies as well, but as I always advise my patients, I do remember to set aside some “me time”, where I read, walk (not both at the same time *grin*), blog, listen to music, watch movies, spend time with my cats and my family, and keep in touch with friends from all over.

I’m also just like most of my patients – a gluten-intolerant lady with a topsy-turvy immune system that resulted in a hypothyroid condition and brain fog, whose body stopped compensating.  I also had severe anemia and excessive adrenal stress, resulting in a pre-diabetic state.  To top it off, my system was ravaged with an intestinal bacterial infection and two separate types of intestinal parasite.

Like my patients, I’m getting better!  I’m amazed at the power of properly-used natural alternatives.  Life is good again.  And now, I’m immensely enjoying the observation of similar transformations in the lives of my patients.  We’re all works in progress, and health (and indeed life itself) is a journey…I say enjoy it! 🙂