Tag Archives: physiology

What Functional Medicine is NOT, Part 2:

In the last post, I brought up a few myths that I frequently come across and dissected them.  As I mentioned before, when different practitioners use the same term (in this case Functional Medicine) to mean various things (such as nutrition, bioidentical hormones, or fad diets), this confuses people.  People are just starting to find out about Functional Medicine as it is, and many people aren’t exactly sure what it means.  And who can blame them?  It seems as though there is too wide a variety and not enough consistency, and people aren’t sure where to turn or who to trust.  I thought I’d help sort things out.

Since the last post got longer than I expected, I decided to split it into two parts.  Here is the second part…

Truth #5: Functional Medicine is not a scam, voodoo witch-doctor healing, or old wives’ tales.  The Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM) has published an authoritative textbook that covers nearly all aspects of true Functional Medicine.  The author page boasts an enormous amount of inter-disciplinary collaboration, meaning that Medical Doctors, PhDs, Doctors of Chiropractic, Doctors of Osteopathy, Naturopathic Doctors, Certified Clinical Nutritionists, Dentists, Massage Therapists, Physical Therapists, people with Masters degrees including Masters in Public Health, and Acupuncturists have all worked together to produce this resourceful body of knowledge.  The book cites numerous solid references to genuine studies published in standard, respected peer-reviewed journals across the world.

And that’s just the textbook that many of us use.  In addition, there are classes affiliated with educational institutions that are recognized and accredited by the US Department of Education.  There are cutting-edge authoritative books written for the public by esteemed authors such as Datis Kharrazian, whose protocols I follow (with a few modifications for individual needs and sensitivities), which by itself cites over 600 genuine references.

True Functional Medicine bases their holistic treatment approaches on diagnostic lab test results ordered through standard blood laboratories (the same ones that any hospital or conventional doctors would use), and other CLIA-certified specialty laboratories.  The reference ranges used to interpret lab work are narrower than these labs have set, but are nonetheless based on respected organizations such as the American Endocrine Society and the Vitamin D Council.

Truth #6: Functional Medicine has nothing to do with muscle testing or AK.  Some practitioners utilize “muscle testing”, also known as Applied Kinesiology (AK).  This involves having you hold your arm out, resisting the practitioner’s attempts to push/pull your arm in a certain direction (or directions).  Once he or she establishes that the muscle group s/he’ll use for testing is working properly, s/he’ll have you touch certain points on your body, make certain movements, hold certain positions, or hold certain objects.  These practitioners claim that the results of this “testing” can show if you have a liver problem or adrenal issue.

I have several significant problems with this.  First, the test itself may not be accurate or reliable.  Not only is it incredibly vulnerable to practitioner manipulation (whether he or she is aware of their influence or not), but the scientific research has not been done to back up the validity of this so-called testing.  Not only that, but even if its results are accurate (and let’s say the test really is valid for adrenal dysfunction), there are multiple kinds of dysfunction.  There is overactivity, underactivity, and normal activity but in a chaotic rhythm.  Muscle testing can’t reliably break things down that far, and it certainly can’t quantify it into objective numbers like real lab testing can.

Truth #7: Functional Medicine is a real, recognized form of medicine, not something the alternative medical community made up.  Functional Medicine is not a “chiropractic thing”; in fact, it’s not specific to any single healthcare discipline.  It’s definitely not a fly-by-night approach to be considered second to conventional medicine, with conventional medicine holding the ultimate authority, from whom everyone else (patients and other practitioners) must seek approval.  Functional Medicine, in most situations, can very well be regarded on an equal playing field as any medication-based approach, and Functional Medicine doctors are every bit as knowledgeable in their approach as (and sometimes even moreso than) conventional practitioners who have not studied this approach.

Functional Medicine is indeed a medical subspecialty; its non-pharmaceutical approach allows any non-drug practitioners, including Naturopathic Doctors (in states that license them–of which Texas, where I live, is not one), Doctors of Chiropractic, and others to practice.  Essentially, as long as the practitioner is licensed in the state in which they practice, and their license covers the ordering of diagnostic lab testing, then they may also legally interpret the results and offer a Functional Medicine approach.

I hope that clears up some of the confusion out there. 🙂

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How Functional Medicine works – the nuts & bolts

Practiced properly, true Functional Medicine orders a LOT of diagnostic testing because each test gives another piece of information, much like putting together a puzzle.  Basic testing only gives you part of the puzzle picture; you’re never really sure what the rest is supposed to say, and you’re forced to guess.  I don’t like putting my patients’ health at that kind of risk; it’s too important.  So the testing is non-negotiable – and why wouldn’t it be?  The human body is quite complex and there’s a lot to evaluate.

Actually, a good evaluation starts before testing is ordered:

  • Lifestyle habits
  • Dietary analysis
  • Trauma and illness history
  • Thorough symptom and metabolic questionnaires
  • Complete medical history
  • Vaccination schedule
  • Medication and supplement regimen
  • Cognitive evaluation
  • Motivation assessment

An important concept in Functional Medicine is that the testing conventional doctors order is not nearly enough.  It barely scratches the surface, because the current healthcare system is driven by insurance companies who do not see the merit in prevention; they are in the business of screening for advanced, established disease and then patching the symptoms with medication when they get further out of hand.

Once we uncover and identify dysfunctions, the doctor takes a secondary, supportive role in the patient’s care as the spotlight begins to shine on patient him- or herself.  The patient’s participation and initiative become crucial for a successful outcome.  He or she may be asked/required to do any of the following:

  • Dietary changes – short-term, long-term, or permanent
  • Specific supplementation – short-term, long-term, or lifelong
  • Specific exercises – these can include eye movements, walking, stretches, arm circles, strength training, interval training, or yoga positions
  • Homecare instructions – these can include doing math or art, reading, prayer or meditation, or utilizing the senses such as listening to music or smelling various scents
  • Other modalities and specialties – acupuncture, massage therapy, aromatherapy, talk therapy, thermography, colon hydrotherapy, homeopathy, physical therapy, brain-based therapy, conventional medical intervention, and more
  • Other lifestyle modifications – TV or computer limitations, activity modification, sleep-wake schedules, work environment, and others

It’s a challenge, and each person must decide for themselves whether or not they’re ready to take the plunge.  Commitment is key.  Motivation is key.  The effort is worth it; one of these days I’ll share some of my patients’ success stories–real cases (while protecting privacy), to demonstrate the power and miraculous relief that Functional Medicine can bring when conventional medicine, traditional alternative medicine, and self-treatment via the web have ALL failed.  It’s truly amazing!